Just a few stories to share in this week’s What’s Hot Wednesday for Business Leaders. I took some much needed PTO last Friday (riding waverunners at the Jersey shore) so wasn’t as “plugged in” as I typically am. Still, here are pieces that caught my attention that I wanted to share in the name of progress:

  • In honor of our new federal holiday, here’s a fascinating piece from Fast Company for all you allies out there. It’s a combination of quotes, interviews, and multimedia segments about how the tech industry is (or isn’t) making strides regarding diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Uncomfortable conversations, those driven by friction, are needed says Rhett Lindsey, CEO of recruiting platform Siimee, is a recruiting and hiring platform that connects job seekers and employers through a 1-to-1 matching experience that eliminates the human biases that often occur early in the hiring process.

  • This too is from Fast Company. It’s by Code2040 leaders Mimi Fox Melton and Karla Monterroso and about getting over the fear of conflict that stymies us from having the productive conversations that are often friction driven.
  • Forward-thinking, forward-acting Hootsuite (social media management platform) announced it’s closing down for a week in July so that ALL employees can take a break to focus on mental wellness and health. Here’s more about what they’re doing, why, and how. As society and business work to de-stigmatize the need to keep our minds as healthy as we keep our bodies, you’ll be hearing a lot more on this topic. If your company is doing something noteworthy, or you know of a company that is breaking down the silence around mental health, please share with me so I can share with our readers.

  • What’s the rarest type of employee, and how many does your company have? Bill Sanders talks about Adam Grant’s research for CNBC. Are there ways you can encourage your takers and neutrals to get in the spirit of giving?

Do Good Spotlight on:  National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC)

We’ve been donating to this organization for years and wanted to put it back on your radar too. The nation’s resource for issues of missing and sexually exploited children, The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children is a non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation whose mission is to help find missing children, reduce child sexual exploitation, and prevent child victimization.

Since 1984, NCMEC has served as the national clearinghouse and resource center for families, victims, private organizations, law enforcement and the public on issues relating to missing and sexually exploited children.

You can learn more as well as donate via this website (the donate button was malfunctioning earlier this week—if it’s still wonky, you can donate via their Facebook Page too).

I hope you enjoyed this week’s e-briefing and that the rest of your week is smooth sailing. Enjoy!